Benchmark Business Group

Creating Sales "Wins"

November 7, 2017

This insight is Part I in a four part series that will be released through the month of November.  At the end of the article there are additional links to the remaining insights. 

 
What is a win for you?
When you're in sales, especially sales with a longer cycle, it's easy to get discouraged. There are days where you might think you've accomplished nothing, because you didn't get the "win" of closing on a deal. It's understandable. Closing a deal gets you paid; and, if you're like most salespeople there's a rush of excitement that comes with the closing.
 
It is, however, a mistake to rely on the rush of a closing as your only win. Think of sales like a marathon. The closing is the moment you cross the finish line. It feels great, but those last few steps are not what made the race. Sure, steps 50-245 may not be as glamorous as those last few over the line. You may have had a rush of excitement at the end that carried you across the line, but what really counted was back on step 500 where you felt like quitting. When it seemed like maybe a sale wasn't going to happen, but you decided to stick it out.  Those small steps are the true wins.
 
Your true wins are easier to control than closings. They may not be as glamorous on the surface, but they definitely count. In fact, they count even more, because without them you'll never have a chance to win. Crossing the finish line/closing the sale is always the end result, but to get there more often you need to truly understand what a win is in your sales process. Your "win" is unique as it should be based on personal goals, your skill set, and your sales process, but it's easy to discover. True wins include being able to answer: 
  • How many people does it take to find one lead?
  • How many leads does it take to get an appointment?
  • How many appointments does it take to close a sale?
If you focus on these smaller, but easier to influence wins, two things will happen:
  1. Your days will get easier and more enjoyable. There will still be days you feel discouraged and frustrated, but taking a few more steps is a lot easier if you believe in the process. If you rely on a closing for a "win" you're often setting yourself up to feel like a failure. And the worst part is the failure isn't even real. Many sales processes have a long cycle. You won't get a closing every day, but you can "win" every day if you follow your sales process.
     
  2. You'll see results. Your closings won't be as sporadic or random. You'll be able to control the peaks and valleys. When you're laser focused on closings it's easy to push off the activities that truly make a difference. It's easier to stop making calls. To take time off. To stop getting the true wins. If you're always watching and focusing on the small wins your pipeline will remain robust and you'll begin to wonder why people think sales is so difficult, because selling doesn't feel so hard when you're counting the true wins.
It's important to realize that not every day is the exact same when it comes to winning. Just like in a race, pace is vital. A successful salesperson understands that they are in control of their wins. It's up to you to create a balance that works best for you. That balance doesn't have to be the same day in and out. That balance comes from knowing what a "win" is each and every day. You achieve this through "intentional imbalance." Join us next week to find out more...
 

Creating Sales Wins Series


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